Alameda Point

On Tuesday, the City Council will hold a closed-door discussion to consider proposals to purchase chunks of Alameda Point.

On Tuesday, the City Council will hold a closed-door discussion to consider proposals to purchase chunks of Alameda Point.

The traffic that development at Alameda Point will – or won’t – create was the central focus of Monday’s Planning Board hearing on a draft report detailing the potential environmental and other impacts of the proposed development scheme.

The hearing was the first of two intended to offer the public the chance to weigh in on whether the environmental impact report adequately addresses the potential traffic, wildlife and other impacts of 1,425 homes and 5 million square feet of office space at Alameda Point, which would put about 3,400 new residents and 8,900 jobs on 878 acres of the former Naval Air Station. A second hearing is scheduled for September 25.

The traffic that development at Alameda Point will – or won’t – create was the central focus of Monday’s Planning Board hearing on a draft report detailing the potential environmental and other impacts of the proposed development scheme.

The hearing was the first of two intended to offer the public the chance to weigh in on whether the environmental impact report adequately addresses the potential traffic, wildlife and other impacts of 1,425 homes and 5 million square feet of office space at Alameda Point, which would put about 3,400 new residents and 8,900 jobs on 878 acres of the former Naval Air Station. A second hearing is scheduled for September 25.

One of the many challenges to be faced by the city and developers seeking to revitalize Alameda Point will be rising seas. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last estimated that the world’s mean sea level could rise by between 7 and 23 inches by 2099 (new estimates are due in just a few weeks); state-level estimates put sea level rise on California’s coasts as high as 69 inches by the turn of the next century.

One of the many challenges to be faced by the city and developers seeking to revitalize Alameda Point will be rising seas. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last estimated that the world’s mean sea level could rise by between 7 and 23 inches by 2099 (new estimates are due in just a few weeks); state-level estimates put sea level rise on California’s coasts as high as 69 inches by the turn of the next century.

Proposed development at Alameda Point and elsewhere on the Island could back up traffic at a host of major intersections – in the Park Street business district, on the East End and in Oakland.

The finding was part of a draft study detailing the development’s potential impact on traffic, wildlife, air and water quality and a host of other items that was released by the city this week. The public has until October 21 to review and comment on the 1,000-page document and whether it adequately addresses the impact the development could have on the Island; public hearings are scheduled for Monday and September 25.

Proposed development at Alameda Point and elsewhere on the Island could back up traffic at a host of major intersections – in the Park Street business district, on the East End and in Oakland.

The finding was part of a draft study detailing the development’s potential impact on traffic, wildlife, air and water quality and a host of other items that was released by the city this week. The public has until October 21 to review and comment on the 1,000-page document and whether it adequately addresses the impact the development could have on the Island; public hearings are scheduled for Monday and September 25.

Many moons ago, we asked our readers what questions they had about Alameda Point, and what information they were lacking. Several of you asked for maps - of the buildings marked for preservation and demolition, and also, of the toxics that remain. Among other things contained in the 1,000-page environmental impact report released by the city this week is a map of all the cleanup areas at the Point, along with a list and a few pages of narrative that explains what's going on at each. We've pulled those from the report and are posting them here for your easy reference.

Many moons ago, we asked our readers what questions they had about Alameda Point, and what information they were lacking. Several of you asked for maps - of the buildings marked for preservation and demolition, and also, of the toxics that remain. Among other things contained in the 1,000-page environmental impact report released by the city this week is a map of all the cleanup areas at the Point, along with a list and a few pages of narrative that explains what's going on at each. We've pulled those from the report and are posting them here for your easy reference.

Pages