Alameda Point

Editor's note: The Alamedan wishes to acknowledge the team at Alameda Point Info for providing source documents for this story.

One of the primary challenges facing city leaders seeking to revitalize Alameda Point is how to manage all of the traffic that new homes and businesses will generate.

Editor's note: The Alamedan wishes to acknowledge the team at Alameda Point Info for providing source documents for this story.

One of the primary challenges facing city leaders seeking to revitalize Alameda Point is how to manage all of the traffic that new homes and businesses will generate.

When city leaders signed a deal to receive about 1,800 acres of Alameda Point from the Navy at no cost, it came with one small string attached: The city had to agree to construct no more than 1,425 new homes on the land – or to pay a premium of $50,000 for each new home that exceeds the limit.

When city leaders signed a deal to receive about 1,800 acres of Alameda Point from the Navy at no cost, it came with one small string attached: The city had to agree to construct no more than 1,425 new homes on the land – or to pay a premium of $50,000 for each new home that exceeds the limit.

Mayor Marie Gilmore addresses the crowd at Alameda Point on Monday.

Some 150 dignitaries, city staffers and civic affairs-watchers gathered Monday under drizzly skies and the jet at Alameda Point’s North Gate to commemorate the Navy’s handoff of 1,379 acres of the former Naval Air Station to the city.

Mayor Marie Gilmore addresses the crowd at Alameda Point on Monday.

Some 150 dignitaries, city staffers and civic affairs-watchers gathered Monday under drizzly skies and the jet at Alameda Point’s North Gate to commemorate the Navy’s handoff of 1,379 acres of the former Naval Air Station to the city.

Plans for Alameda Point, then and now.

Bill Clinton’s ascension to the presidency heralded a sea change in the way the federal government disposed of the dozens of military bases they began shuttering in the late 1980s. The Clinton administration offered communities an alternative to the feds’ existing practice of trying to sell the former military installations: The government would give communities first rights to the property, for free, if they promised to reuse it in a way that generated jobs.

Plans for Alameda Point, then and now.

Bill Clinton’s ascension to the presidency heralded a sea change in the way the federal government disposed of the dozens of military bases they began shuttering in the late 1980s. The Clinton administration offered communities an alternative to the feds’ existing practice of trying to sell the former military installations: The government would give communities first rights to the property, for free, if they promised to reuse it in a way that generated jobs.

Bay Area housing and transportation planners are finalizing a new regional development strategy that could channel badly needed dollars into future development efforts at Alameda Point and Alameda’s Northern Waterfront, though city staffers fear it may not be enough money to support needed transportation improvements for all the homes and jobs the developments are expected to accommodate.

Bay Area housing and transportation planners are finalizing a new regional development strategy that could channel badly needed dollars into future development efforts at Alameda Point and Alameda’s Northern Waterfront, though city staffers fear it may not be enough money to support needed transportation improvements for all the homes and jobs the developments are expected to accommodate.

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