Alameda City Council

 
Alameda's City Council returns from a one-month break next Tuesday to consider a trio of development issues.

The council will consider appeals of the Planning Board's approval of a 100-room hotel on Harbor Bay Parkway and also, final approvals for a 52-unit residential complex that will replace abandoned World War II-era warehouses at 2100 Clement Avenue. City staff will also give council members a report detailing the pros and cons of creating a wetlands mitigation bank at Alameda Point.

Alameda’s City Council will get a report Thursday on homelessness on the Island and on next steps that should be taken to combat it.

The report follows a homeless count conducted last September that was spearheaded by the city’s Social Service Human Relations Board. The board decided to conduct the count after a resident voiced concern that the number of homeless people frequenting Alameda’s West End appeared to be on the rise.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here’s what happened in Alameda this week.

Students at Bay Farm School recently responded to First Lady Michelle Obama's #GimmeFive dance challenge by learning this dance, featured on the Ellen DeGeneres Show. The challenge is part of the First Lady's Let's Move! campaign, which aims to boost Americans' physical fitness.

City leaders on Tuesday unanimously okayed a $188 million budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1 and a $174.4 million budget for 2016-17.

“We’ve shown restraint. And we’ve also started to restore some of the cuts we made during the Great Recession,” said City Councilman Jim Oddie, who said the budget begins to address deferred maintenance and long-term retiree costs.

Mayor Trish Herrera Spencer, who voiced some concerns about the overtime budget for public safety, said she thinks the budgets serve the whole city.

“I think this is a step toward correcting (funding for) departments that have truly been left behind,” Spencer said.

The City Council signed off on budgets and police body cameras on Tuesday. Here's the tweet by tweet.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence local news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

City Council members have signed off on an $8 million contract to build a replacement mid-Island fire station and emergency operations center.

The approval, on a 4-1 vote, followed a wide-ranging discussion about what the city should be doing to better prepare for a disaster. Richmond-based Alten Construction was the winning bidder.

Once shovels hit dirt, construction of the two facilities, which will sit on a 0.57-acre site at the corner of Grand Street and Buena Vista Avenue, should be completed within 12 months.

Tuesday night's six-hour gabfest included approval of an $8 million construction contract for a replacement fire station and emergency operations center, a proposal to raise sewer rates and an update on Site A. Here's your tweet by tweet.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence weekly news review. Here’s what happened on the Island this week.

Californians are being asked to conserve water in the face of a stubborn drought. Here’s what your neighbors are doing to save water.

An eagle-eyed regular reader who noticed that we hadn't updated our development map since December asked if we could revise and repost it. Well, ask and ye shall receive.

City Council members agreed in principle on new rules intended to strengthen its process for mediating rent disputes but stopped short of passing an ordinance on Tuesday.

Council members said Tuesday that they are prepared to approve rules that would enshrine the existence of the city’s Rent Review Advisory Committee in the city’s code, require landlords to provide renters information about the committee when they hand out rent increases and require landlords and tenants to participate in scheduled rent dispute hearings.