Alameda Police Department

The City Council offered preliminary approvals for a plan to build up to 380 new homes on the 11-acre Del Monte warehouse, a development that one council member said could offer the last new housing the Island will see for years.

Alameda police are rescinding a ticket they gave a homeless veteran on a charge he was illegally living in his car.

On October 1, the department asked the Alameda County Superior Court to dismiss a ticket issued to Aaron Colyer after police found him sitting in a parking lot in his van. And Alameda’s top cop confirmed the city may revise the ordinance that Colyer, 34, was cited under.

“I'm happy that the City of Alameda has agreed to stop violating the constitutional rights of homeless persons and hope that all homeless people will now come park in Alameda where they will be safe from harassment, threats and intimidation for existing,” Colyer said.

Alameda police have arrested two men in connection with a string of apparent arson fires that took place within a seven-block radius on and around Park Street Sunday morning.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, our weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Updated at 8:32 a.m. Thursday, August 14

Alameda’s top cop says the police department will do more to help homeless people following the release of a video that showed local police ticketing a homeless veteran and suggesting he leave Alameda for Oakland.

Posted in late July, the roughly 14-minute video shows Alameda police ticketing 34-year-old Aaron Colyer on a charge he was illegally living in his vehicle. Police told Colyer he couldn’t sleep in his van, which was parked in a lot near the Main Street ferry terminal, and that he would have to move on.

THE STORY: Local, regional and state agencies conducted a multi-million-dollar effort last year to clear the Alameda/Oakland Estuary of sunken vessels that were determined to cause a navigation hazard and they chased away “anchor outs” illegally perched in the channel. But a pair of “anchor outs” has returned, posing a fresh challenge to public agencies and marina managers seeking to keep the Estuary clean.

Alameda police will soon be equipped with license plate readers that can scan and store thousands of license plate numbers that can be automatically checked against lists of stolen cars and wanted criminal suspects and saved for future use in criminal investigations.

The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to allow the police department to spend up to $80,000 to purchase four of the license plate readers from Livermore-based Vigilant Solutions. Police Chief Paul Rolleri said the readers should be operational by the end of this summer.

The Alameda Police Department is offering free child safety seat inspections from 10 a.m. to noon this Saturday, April 26 in the parking lot at police headquarters, 1555 Oak Street.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Alameda Police Chief Paul Rolleri said he doesn’t know whether it’s gratifying or horrifying that officers in his department wrote 62 tickets in five hours during a February pedestrian crosswalk sting.

The department is stepping up its efforts to make sure pedestrians cross Alameda’s streets safely and to let the public know the department takes pedestrian safety seriously, and the periodic stings are one of several strategies it’s employing. Other efforts will include safety messages on the department’s Twitter account and Facebook page, a poster contest for Alameda’s students and “May You Arrive Safely,” a safety walk scheduled for May 3.