City Hall

Alameda's administrative services director is heading to Tracy.

Stephanie Garrabrant-Sierra is leaving the Island for an assistant city manager's post in Tracy. She starts work in that city on September 1.

The city brought Garrabrant-Sierra on as an assistant city attorney in June 2012. In November 2013 it elevated her to the position of administrative services director, putting her in charge of contracting, purchasing, human resources and information technology. She has also advised the city on collective bargaining issues with its labor unions.

The job was created by former City Manager John Russo as part of a restructuring effort at City Hall.

Development of Site A (or any portion of Alameda Point) can’t proceed unless four of the council’s five members agree to move forward. So if two council members have already said they oppose building homes at Alameda Point, what are the chances that the development will move forward?

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, local news review. Here are your Alameda headlines for the week.

City Council members have asked Assistant City Manager Liz Warmerdam to serve as Alameda’s interim city manager when the city’s current manager, John Russo, leaves on May 1. The City Council voted unanimously last week to offer Warmerdam, who started her municipal career in Alameda and came back as assistant city manager in 2013, the interim city manager’s job.

City Council members have asked Assistant City Manager Liz Warmerdam to serve as Alameda’s interim city manager when the city’s current manager, John Russo, leaves on May 1.

The City Council voted unanimously last week to offer Warmerdam, who started her municipal career in Alameda and came back as assistant city manager in 2013, the interim city manager’s job. The council will vote on a contract for Warmerdam at a date to be announced.

“I’m looking forward to working with Liz Warmerdam in this capacity. I really think it’s an opportunity for us to get to know her and to see her strengths,” Mayor Trish Herrera Spencer said.

The City Council is set to consider leasing a waterfront site that could be home to the first construction project at Alameda Point – a maintenance and operations center for the Bay Area’s public ferry service.

Tonight, the council will consider offering initial approval of a 60-year lease granting the Water Emergency Transportation Authority a spot on West Hornet Avenue to build its planned four-story Central Bay Operations and Maintenance Center. If the council okays the lease, construction of the $45 million to $50 million project could begin in January and the facility could be ready to open by May 2017.

City Manager John Russo is leaving Alameda for the city manager's job in Riverside, an official with that city confirmed Thursday. Russo has been Alameda's top administrator since 2011.

The East Bay Regional Park District has filed a request to dismiss its two-year-old lawsuit against the City of Alameda over city leaders' decision to zone property the park district wanted to permit housing, the park district announced Tuesday.

Members of the City Council voted Tuesday to abandon plans to create a city-sponsored rents task force, opting instead to allow a local attorney to lead a community-based process to explore concerns about rising rents.

The council voted 3-2 to move forward with the community based process; the community group is to report its findings on December 2. Council members didn’t make any decisions about when – or if – they would move forward with an official task force in the future.

The task force proposal was the result of growing concerns over evictions and rising rents in Alameda. More than half of Alameda’s residents are renters.

Alameda's City Council narrowly voted down a proposal to form a city-sponsored task force to examine the nature and impact of rent increases, instead opting to adopt a surprise proposal to proceed with an informal community process. That and more, in tweets.

Five years ago the city laid off half of its planning department, as the economy fell into a deep recession and construction projects came to a screeching halt. But now that the economy is recovering, the city’s permit counter is busier than ever, planning staffers say.