lawsuits

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence weekly news review. Here’s what happened on the Island this week.

Californians are being asked to conserve water in the face of a stubborn drought. Here’s what your neighbors are doing to save water.

An eagle-eyed regular reader who noticed that we hadn't updated our development map since December asked if we could revise and repost it. Well, ask and ye shall receive.

 

The city has settled a lawsuit accusing Alameda police of using excessive force against a disabled man they arrested on suspicion of stealing a cell phone charger from a local phone store.

The City Council approved a settlement Tuesday to pay Jeffrey Navarro $450,000 to settle Navarro’s claims arising from the July 27, 2012 arrest. City officials said they’re not admitting any wrongdoing in the case.

Schools officials have set up a procedure for commercial property owners to obtain partial refunds on the Measure H parcel tax.

The district has posted an application on its website for commercial property owners seeking refunds for taxes paid in late 2010 and 2011. The deadline for property owners seeking refunds for taxes paid in December 2010 is this coming December 15.

The final deadline for requesting a refund is April 15, 2015.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Alameda and a list of other East Bay cities and wastewater districts will fix aging sewers in an effort to keep sewage from spilling into San Francisco Bay and the Oakland/Alameda Estuary as part of a lawsuit settlement announced Monday.

THE STORY: The East Bay Regional Park District and environmentalists are battling to halt plans to develop 48 homes on a 3.9 acre property across the street from Crab Cove, which the federal government is in contract to sell to developer Tim Lewis Communities. So far, two lawsuits have been filed over the property and plans to develop it, and local parks lovers have qualified a measure for the ballot that would prohibit housing development there.

Preservationists have dropped a lawsuit that threatened to undo a complex cash and land swap deal between the city, the school district and the Alameda Housing Authority.

Supporters of a park on land slated for development as a residential neighborhood submitted petition signatures for a possible ballot measure that would bar the city from allowing homes to be built there instead.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

The city has scored what officials hope is a final legal victory in a trio of bondholder lawsuits that followed the sale of Alameda Municipal Power’s telecommunications business in 2008.

The suits, which accused the city of cheating the original architect of its cable and internet system of payments that were due and fudging disclosure documents to make the planned telecom enterprise appear more profitable than it was expected to be, could have cost the city a much as $25 million.

On April 1, U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston offered a judgment voiding Vectren Communications Services’ final claim against the city, though the judgment is subject to appeal.