Measure I school bond

Should Alameda have one comprehensive high school or two? About 50 people – including school board members past, present and prospective – showed up at Will C. Wood Middle School on Thursday night to discuss the pros and cons of each.

The meeting was the first of several set up to allow community and school board members to discuss whether Alameda should consider building a single comprehensive school, a topic architect Mark Quattrochi said hasn’t been seriously broached on the Island since the 1980s. District staff is slated to make a recommendation to school board members on February 24.

Voters issued a stunning rebuke to Alameda’s incumbents Tuesday, with the tally so far showing they intend to send City Councilman Stewart Chen, longtime school board trustee Mike McMahon and Mayor Marie Gilmore packing.

Last week, we offered you our quick takes on your candidates for mayor and City Council. Today we’ve got part two of that story, with a rundown on three candidates for two school board seats and also, the Measure I school bond.

The winners of the school board contest will be charged with helping pick a permanent superintendent, overseeing the continued implementation of new Common Core educational standards and a new funding formula, considering a replacement parcel tax in advance of Measure A’s 2018 expiration and, if it passes, overseeing Measure I bond-funded school facility fixes.

City Councilman Stewart Chen has taken the lead in Alameda’s campaign money race, newly released donor disclosure documents show.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence local news review. Here’s what happened in Alameda this week.

An earthquake centered near American Canyon rattled the Bay Area a little before 3:30 a.m. Sunday. While the 6.0 temblor caused damage and knocked out power for many near the epicenter, Alamedans only lost sleep. Here's what happened and what Island residents shaken awake by the quake had to say.

This fall, Alameda voters will be asked to consider paying higher property taxes to cover $179.5 million in bonds to upgrade the Island’s schools.