Mike McMahon

Last week, we offered you our quick takes on your candidates for mayor and City Council. Today we’ve got part two of that story, with a rundown on three candidates for two school board seats and also, the Measure I school bond.

The winners of the school board contest will be charged with helping pick a permanent superintendent, overseeing the continued implementation of new Common Core educational standards and a new funding formula, considering a replacement parcel tax in advance of Measure A’s 2018 expiration and, if it passes, overseeing Measure I bond-funded school facility fixes.

Updated at 5:16 p.m. Thursday, October 30 in BOLD

With Election Day less than a week away – and formal campaign finance disclosure deadlines safely behind us – independent groups are unleashing tens of thousands of dollars to fund a mountain of last-minute mailers touting (or trashing) local candidates and ballot measures.

City Councilman Stewart Chen has taken the lead in Alameda’s campaign money race, newly released donor disclosure documents show.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

A plan to build 414 new homes in and around an historic Del Monte warehouse all but sailed through the Planning Board on Monday, though Planning Board members voted to hold off on okaying a required traffic management plan until some fixes are made. The City Council is expected to consider approving the project on November 18. Here’s our tweet by tweet.

A school board veteran, a special education teacher and an accountant who helped start a local youth sports league are vying for a pair of seats on Alameda’s Board of Education this fall.

Alameda has good neighborhood elementary schools, a pair of candidates for the local school board say. And they said they intend to keep it that way.

Do you support passage of Measure I? Why or why not?

Last week, we offered you an early look at ballot statements submitted by your candidates for mayor and City Council – effectively, their 200-words-or-less pitches describing why you should elect them to represent you at City Hall. This week we’ve got a second installment of statements, for school board candidates. (We’d promised health care district board statements too, but the only candidate who submitted one – Lynn Bratchett – withdrew it, an Alameda County Registrar of Voters rep told us Tuesday.)

Here’s what each of the three candidates for school board had to say for themselves.

BOARD OF EDUCATION

Alameda voters will decide on candidates for the school board after all, as a third candidate for two open board seats filed his paperwork to run on Wednesday.