Sean McPhetridge

Alameda’s Board of Education voted Tuesday to give Superintendent Sean McPhetridge some birthday presents: A new contract and a shorter title.

The board voted unanimously to offer McPhetridge the school district’s top spot on a more permanent basis, removing the word “interim” from his title and okaying a $220,000-a-year contract that goes into effect today. Tuesday was McPhetridge’s 50th birthday.

“I’m humbled, and I’m honored, and I’m thankful and I’m grateful to this city, and to the people who work in these schools,” McPhetridge said. “I hope I continue to pass the audition.”

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Some High Street residents are calling on tech companies that run buses through Alameda to address the traffic and parking problems they said the buses can create. A city official says they became aware of the concerns in June and are working to address them.

Alameda’s Board of Education has hired veteran Alameda schools administrator Sean McPhetridge to serve as the Island's interim schools chief for the 2014-15 school year, which starts on August 25.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, our weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Schools leaders are preparing to hire veteran Alameda schools administrator Sean McPhetridge to serve as the Island's interim schools chief for the 2014-15 school year.

McPhetridge resigned his posted as assistant superintendent in 2013, after serving three years. He has also served as Alameda Unified's director of secondary and career technical education, principal of the Alameda Science and Technology Institute early college magnet high school and a vice principal at Alameda High School.

This past June he was hired on as the Alameda County Office of Education's interim director of student programs and services, his LinkedIn profile shows.

When Jim Franz was a schoolboy in the 1940s, bullying was kids getting pushed around on the playground. But in the intervening years it’s come to be recognized as something more mental and verbal than physical, and its reach has extended from the finite frontier of a schoolyard blacktop to the infinite reaches of cyberspace.

“It’s more than just this little thing that happens on the way to school,” said Franz, the city’s community development coordinator.